top of page

Psychological and mental health in Yemen suffers from a lack of resources and a negative social outlook

Updated: Jan 14

7 million people, or nearly a quarter of Yemen's population, suffer from psychological trauma and stress as a result of the ongoing conflict.
الصحة النفسية والعقلية في اليمن بحاجة إلى تدخلات عاجلة. مصدر الصورة Jinane Saad/MSF
Psychological and mental health in Yemen needs urgent interventions. Image source: Jinane Saad/MSF

Due to a lack of trained professionals and treatment facilities, many parts of Yemen lack mental health and psychosocial support services. Even if these services exist, people may be hesitant to use them due to social stigma. According to a recent World Health Organization report, an estimated 7 million people, or nearly a quarter of Yemen's population, suffer from psychological trauma and stress as a result of the ongoing conflict. Everyone requires mental health care, but only 120,000 people have consistent access to it.


Collaboration among WHO, Civil Protection Operations and European Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) has aided in the strengthening of mental health and psychosocial support in Yemen, while also prioritizing the most vulnerable groups suffering from mental illness. Dr. Ashjan Youssef, a Yemeni mental health worker, emphasized the urgent need for more resources and trained professionals to address the country's mental health crisis in the World Health Organization report. She emphasized the significance of a strong mental health support system.


The World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO) have strengthened 17 mental health and psychosocial support units in Yemen by providing new furniture, psychiatric medications, and training for mental health workers. The World Health Organization worked with the Ministry of Public Health and Population to create the country's most recent national mental health strategy, which is an important step toward a more accessible health system.


The World Health Organization emphasized in the report that Yemen's mental health crisis requires immediate attention, as well as prioritizing care, raising awareness, and establishing a strong support system.


In general, local cultures can have a significant impact on mental health outcomes. While it is critical to recognize that mental illness is a complex issue with many contributing factors, cultural influences must not be overlooked. Cultural beliefs and attitudes toward mental health, for example, can perpetuate stigma. In some cultures, mental illness is considered taboo or a sign of weakness, making people feel ashamed or hesitant to seek help. This stigma can keep people from receiving necessary support and treatment, worsening their situation.


Furthermore, some indigenous cultures may have a limited understanding and awareness of mental health issues. This lack of understanding can result in delayed or inadequate diagnosis, treatment, and support for those suffering from mental illness. Inadequate access to mental health resources and services can exacerbate the situation.


Every culture has its own set of values and coping strategies. While some cultural practices and support systems may benefit mental health, others may unintentionally contribute to mental illness. Traditional gender roles and expectations, for example, can lead to emotional repression, leading to higher rates of depression and anxiety in some people.


Σχόλια


bottom of page