top of page

Hope Amidst Despair: Yemen's Children Battling Malnutrition Find Lifeline in WHO-supported Centers

In war-torn Yemen, children facing malnutrition and disease find hope through WHO-backed therapeutic centers, providing vital care and support amidst a backdrop of poverty and conflict.


Cover photo: A child receiving health care in Yemen. Image source: World Health Organization.


Summary

Yemen's Children Struggle with Malnutrition and Disease

• The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that an estimated 5 million children in Yemen are suffering from acute malnutrition.

• The crisis is exacerbated by the collapse of the healthcare system due to conflict.

• In the latter half of 2023, nearly 1876 children were admitted to these centers, many from remote areas.

• Approximately 8703 children in the same age group were screened for malnutrition, with 40% diagnosed with acute malnutrition and subsequently referred for treatment.

• WHO offers transportation assistance to cover the costs for caregivers to reach the TFCs.

• WHO emphasizes long-term health through counseling sessions on proper nutrition and follow-up care.

• Through collaboration with CERF, WHO has trained over 112 medical workers to deliver quality care and provided essential medicines, supplies, and diagnostic tests.

 

In the war-stricken lands of Yemen, a haunting reality grips the hearts of its youngest inhabitants, as poverty, malnutrition, and illness cast a shadow over their once carefree lives. The latest report from the World Health Organization (WHO) paints a grim picture: an estimated 5 million children in Yemen are suffering from acute malnutrition, their futures hanging in the balance.


Behind these stark statistics lie the poignant tales of individual children grappling with hunger, families stretched to their limits to afford treatment, and arduous journeys undertaken in search of aid.


In Yemen, the struggle to shield children not just from the ravages of war but also from the cruel grasp of hunger and poverty exacerbated by the ongoing crisis is all too real. Compounding this dire situation is the collapse of the healthcare system under the weight of conflict.


Amid this despair, a beacon of hope shines through in the form of Dr. Jamal Al Babeli, a devoted physician at the therapeutic feeding center (TFC) in Bajil Hospital, Hudaydah governorate. Dr. Al Babeli's unwavering determination to elevate the country's healthcare standards embodies the resilience of the human spirit.


Despite the immense challenges he faces, he tirelessly battles to save the lives of children afflicted by malnutrition and disease.


According to the WHO report, Dr. Al Babeli operates within a network of four TFCs supported by the WHO through funding from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF). These centers serve as lifelines, providing vital nutrition interventions, medical supplies, oxygen, and clean water to children in dire need.


In the latter half of 2023, nearly 1876 children were admitted to these centers, many hailing from remote areas with limited access to healthcare. Yet, the demand often surpasses capacity, necessitating referrals to other overburdened facilities. Tragically, some children arrive at the brink of critical condition due to delays in seeking medical help, a consequence of their families' inability to afford timely treatment.


During this period, 1876 children under the age of 5 received treatment, accompanied by counseling for their caregivers. Moreover, approximately 8703 children in the same age group were screened for malnutrition, with 40% diagnosed with acute malnutrition and subsequently referred for treatment.


Dr. Al Babeli underscores the critical importance of providing free-of-charge treatment, which has significantly reduced mortality rates among malnourished children. However, he acknowledges that accessing these services can still pose financial burdens for families already struggling to make ends meet. To alleviate this, WHO offers transportation assistance, covering the costs for caregivers to reach the TFCs.


In addition to immediate medical care, WHO emphasizes the importance of long-term health through counseling sessions on proper nutrition and follow-up care. The organization also supports early childhood development initiatives to aid in the recovery process.


Through collaboration with CERF, WHO has trained over 112 medical workers to deliver quality care and has provided essential medicines, supplies, and diagnostic tests. These efforts have not only saved lives but also instilled hope in Yemen's quest for a healthier future for its children.


Dr. Al Babeli's journey is emblematic of this resilience, as he continues to advocate for the well-being of Yemen's most vulnerable, driven by a profound sense of duty and compassion. In the face of adversity, his dedication serves as a beacon of hope, illuminating the path toward a brighter tomorrow for Yemen's children.

ความคิดเห็น


bottom of page